Requirements

We take some simple but necessary precautions for the health and safety of all of our Guests.


To utilize any of our services, your dog must be current on the following vaccinations:

      • Distemper/Parvo combination
      • Rabies – if over 6 months of age
      • Bordetella (see FAQ about canine cough below)

Puppies:

      • Must be participating in an on-going vaccination plan through their veterinarian.

Download and fill out our client forms ahead of time!

"The Daycare service is a great way to get Syrah out of the house and active. She loves the staff, gets her much needed exercise and socialization, and comes home happy and exhausted!"

~Milan Motroni and Dana Walters

Frequently Asked Questions about Canine Cough:

WHAT IS INFECTIOUS TRACHEOBRONCHITIS (CANINE COUGH)?

“Canine cough” is an infectious bronchitis characterized by a hacking cough which most people describe as sounding like “something stuck in my dog’s throat” sometimes accompanied by sneezing and nasal discharge, which can last anywhere from a few days to several weeks. It is analogous to a chest cold for humans; in general, it resolves on its own. Although this coughing is very annoying, it does not usually develop into anything more serious but can lower the dog’s resistance making him susceptible to secondary infections, therefore, treatment by a veterinarian is recommended. A dog with Canine Cough generally remains active and maintains a normal appetite despite frequent fits of coughing. There is usually no fever or listlessness.

IS IT CURABLE?

Just as in the common cold, tracheobronchitis is not cured but must run its course. Symptoms usually subside within 7-10 days. Many times antibiotics will be prescribed to prevent secondary infection, and sometimes cough suppressants will be prescribed to reduce excessive coughing, but these medications do not attack the disease itself.

CAN MY DOG BE VACCINATED FOR PROTECTION AGAINST TRACHEOBRONCHITIS?

Yes! However, it is important to understand the Bordetella vaccination used to prevent this virus only covers some of the many different strains. Therefore, vaccinating your dog does not prevent your dog from contracting tracheobronchitis, but it is the best means available to reduce the possibility of contracting the virus. Explain to your veterinarian that your dog needs to be vaccinated with the Bordetella vaccine, administered either by injection or intranasal, based on the recommendation of your veterinarian. Vaccines against tracheobronchitis are not always routinely given as part of a puppy or adult dog’s vaccination protocol.

An important note is Zoetis, one of the companies that produces the Bordetella vaccine, has an Immunization Support Guarantee. If your dog(s) receive their vaccine and become symptomatic and diagnosed, Zoetis will cover all examination, diagnostic and therapeutic charges up to a maximum of $5,000. Speak with your veterinarian and make sure your dog is protected with a Zoetis Bordetella vaccine.

DOES TRACHEOBRONCHITIS OCCUR ONLY IN KENNELS?

No. Since this virus can be present anywhere, and can travel for considerable distances through the air, it can affect any dog… even one which never leaves its own back yard. But tracheobronchitis is more likely to occur when the concentration of dogs is greater such as at dog shows, kennels, veterinarian offices and hospitals as well as pet shops. Dogs can also be exposed while running loose or while being walked near other dogs or playing in the park.

ARE THE CHANCES OF CATCHING IT GREATER WHEN A DOG IS IN A KENNEL?

It can be because dogs are in the proximity to a number of other dogs and also the excitement of a environment can cause lowered resistance to disease. It is the same factors that explain why children are more likely to catch the flu or a cold in school rather than at home. Dogs with little or no regular contact with others are more likely to contract canine cough when exposed to other dogs. Social dogs, with frequent exposure to others, have a stronger immunity. Dog’s may not show any symptoms of tracheobronchitis but yet may be contagious.

IS THIS VIRUS A NONSTOP ISSUE?

No. Tracheobronchitis, like the flu, is often seasonal. When the virus has run its course another case might not be seen for months.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO HELP PREVENT MY DOG FROM CATCHING TRACHEOBRONCHITIS?

Unfortunately, no amount of supervision, sanitation, or personalized care can prevent a dog from “catching” an airborne virus. To best protect all of our guests, we incorporate the following:

      • Require Bordetella vaccination (injectable or intranasal), administered, at minimum annually, by a veterinarian
      • Power wash and sanitize all suites daily
      • Wash and sanitize all exercise/elimination areas multiple times per day
      • Food bowls are sterilized after every meal and never shared
      • Boarding suites have solid walls between them to limit cross-contamination
      • Symptomatic dogs are immediately placed in an isolation area and monitored
      • We turn away any obviously sick dogs for our onsite services
      • We listen and watch for any signs of sickness
      • We make sure that any dog requiring veterinary attention receives it as quickly as possible
ARE THERE OTHER CAUSES OF COUGHING IN CANINES?

A number of conditions can cause coughing. Here are some of the primary causes. Your veterinarian can help with any questions as to the cause of the cough.

      • Tracheobronchitis
      • Chronic bronchitis
      • Tracheal collapse
      • Heart disease
      • Fungal infections
      • Parasites, such as heartworm and roundworms
      • Foreign bodies
      • Lung cancer
      • Pneumonia
      • Influenza
      • Distemper

“The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.”
~ Mahatma Gandhi